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Author Topic: Turkey necks as chewing treats  (Read 1451 times)
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LoveMy2
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« on: April 21, 2009, 07:22:31 PM »

In the previous years, the girls got big knuckle bones for special occasions. Since Spip's tooth extraction in November (she also has a cracked premolar on the other side that we keep an eye on), I've been racking my brain to try to find something that would be big enough for them to enjoy chewing while having less chances to be damaging to teeth. They are both pretty aggressive chewers -hence the cracked teeth which I am not sure come from the knuckles but still, no more weight bearing cattle bones and are not allergic to poultry.

What do you think about turkey necks ? Could I use that to replace the knuckles ?  The only ones I've seen so far are about 5 inches long. Is that a good size ? I'd try it on a Friday in case there are poop issues but those are pretty low in fat, right ? The only times we had digestive upset after bones was at the very beginning when I did not know that I should trim the extra fat.
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Flem GR DOB 04/24/04 - Nathalie - Spip YL DOB 05/18/02
megs
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« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2009, 07:25:53 PM »

I've never had any trouble with turkey necks.  My dogs love them.
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Kim H
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« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2009, 07:28:38 PM »

I've done turkey necks before (from the Tgiving turkey), but I kinda stay away from them now because Toby didn't hardly chew it, he pretty much swallowed it right up. He was a better eater to chew it I wouldn't worry so much, don't know how your dogs are if they are slow chewers or inhalers. I think if I were to do it again, I would give it frozen to make him have to chew it down.
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mmgy
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« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2009, 09:18:13 PM »

Most of the turkey necks I see are about 8-9 inches long.

Typically all you need to watch with t-necks is that some gulpers may swallow a piece whole, and a t-neck is the same size as a large dog's throat. So I think I'd go with Kim's suggestion of starting with a frozen neck.

A chicken back is often a good size meal for that size dog, and would offer some chewing as well.
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KivaLuver
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« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2009, 09:48:19 PM »

The general consensus among my BARF group (bones and raw food) is that turkey rounds are a major source of choking either from gulping whole or by working off a big chunk. Most think that they are best for smaller dogs since the dog can't chew them up or swallow them whole. Those with big dogs recommend whole heads (whole goat heads, etc), or raw ham bones. I get my gnaw bones from a local raw food distributor. She says that ham bones are perfect for large breeds like GSDs. The ones she sells are way to big to swallow or gulp and come with a nice amount of meat and fat. Kiva and Kaden get lamb legs and lamb trotters.
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LoveMy2
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« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2009, 06:54:41 PM »

OK, armed with your advice I went to another store to see what their meat department had to offer. I found the longer turkey necks but after a closer look, those would indeed be a chocking hazard for Spip who is a gulper/inhaler (Flem is more dainty and would probably do fine) so they are out. Did not see anything that looked like ham bones, asked and they are not to be found. Saw some soup bones (too small, too hard), some beef short ribs (too small), pigs feet (better size but I am not sure they are raw and they are split lengthwise), something labelled pigs tails (did not look like anything) and ... lamb shanks. Those were about 7 inches long, wide as my lower forearm, looked to have a good ratio of meat/fat, a bit pricey but for the occasional treat, I could do it. I think they could clean them out in one session without trouble and they seem big enough not to be a chocking risk if I supervise when they get down to the bone.

Is that what you mean by lamb legs or trotters, KL ? Do you think they would do for the girls ? A whole goat head would probably make their day but I do not see me putting them in the fridge between chew sessions; I'd not dare take the milk out of the fridge in the morning. I'll look some more on the Internet for a source for ham bones -those sound perfect- but have had no luck so far; I do not have a lot of freezer space so I cannot order in big quantities.
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Flem GR DOB 04/24/04 - Nathalie - Spip YL DOB 05/18/02
KivaLuver
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« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2009, 09:52:15 PM »

The trotters are small and have a hinged joint attached. The leg bones are much bigger. Kiva and Kaden can chew the ball off either end of the legs.

Here is one source for ham bones

http://www.onlynaturalpet.com/products/Natures-Variety-Raw-Bones-Turkey-Necks/131080.aspx


There a couple of places around here to buy them. The ones I get are from Nature's Variety.


If you like pork, go to the butcher shop and ask for a fresh ham (pork shoulder roast). You can cut the meat off and give the bone to your dog. They can eat the pork too if they can tolerate it. Some dogs get the runs. Anyhoo....you can cook the meat for yourself in a slow cooker or whatever sounds good.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2009, 09:57:48 PM by KivaLuver » Logged

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LoveMy2
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« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2009, 07:13:54 PM »

Thanks a bunch the explanations and for the link. It's exactly what I was looking for.

The idea of cutting off the meat and cooking it for ourselves is great too. We basically eat poultry and fish but I bet I could find something to do with that kind of pork meat. I am really unknowledgeable about meat cuts because we eat so little of it.
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Flem GR DOB 04/24/04 - Nathalie - Spip YL DOB 05/18/02
Kim H
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« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2009, 07:30:53 PM »

If you through pork shoulder roast in a crockpot with some honey and barbeque sauce and slow cook it for about 6 hours, it will make WONDERFUL pulled pork sandwiches.
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KivaLuver
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« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2009, 08:14:22 PM »

I loved pulled pork sandwiches.  funny dance
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« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2009, 05:32:49 PM »

mmm...that sounds yummy
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