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Author Topic: Article on T8-T10 Subluxation - what are your opinions?  (Read 7801 times)
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LoveNewfies
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« on: January 27, 2007, 11:02:09 AM »

I came across this little article some time ago and the more I look at it, the more I think this may be Jillians issue.  What do you all think?


Dr. William Inman, a clinician in Washington state, feels that canine hip dysplasia is the most over-diagnosed and mis-diagnosed condition in the veterinary medical practice.  While he feels that hip dysplasia is genetically predisposed, he remains puzzled by finding, in his practice, clinically dysplastic dogs with radiographically normal hips and symptom-free dogs with coxofemoral joints that look "like a bomb went off in them."  Inman states, "curiously, in all the young dogs we see with hip dysplasia signs in the 5 to 18 month range, we always find a subluxation at T8-T10 (dislocation of the Thoracic vertebra 8 and Thoracic vertebra 10)."  This is a potentially important finding because the T8 and T10 area "innervates the peraspinal muscles and the iliopsas muscle, which attaches to the femoral head and pulls on the hip socket, flattening the joint....reduction of the subluxation reverses the progression of hip dysplasia by curing the musculo-skeletal dysfun ction."  Inman has relieved the symptoms of more than 3,500 dogs with his procedure.
 
The conclusion that Inman has drawn from his practice is that the T8-T10 subluxation is a physical condition, that, unless dealt with immediately, will progress to the joint capsular fibrosis and muscle stricture associated with decreased range of motion.  The subsequent skeletal changes that follow can only be addressed surgically.  He recommends early intervention in dogs thus afflicted to halt this insidious process.
 
Inman's theory appears radical, but it is not contrary to the concepts previously presented.  He does not maintain that a genetic disease is not associated with hip dysplasia, only that a misdiagnosed physical condition mimics the disease process.  Thus, the incidence of CHD may be lower than previously thought by other researchers.
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mmgy
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« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2007, 11:18:57 AM »

Can you send her x-rays to this guy?
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« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2007, 11:21:44 AM »

I probably could.  I'd have to check with him.  I want to have some more x-rays done anyway - complete thoracic and c-spine.

It definitely fits the bill for what Jillian is going through.
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LoveNewfies
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« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2007, 11:24:15 AM »

More about Dr. Inman

http://www.vomtech.com/bio-bill.htm
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minniesmom
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« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2007, 01:02:42 PM »

That would be great if you could get him to take a look at Jillian!
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